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PREVIOUSLY PLAYED

MACHINES

12:30   2:20   4:15   6:10   8:00   9:45

Through Tuesday, August 15

DIRECTED BY RAHUL JAIN

A visual paradox: intensely sensual images of colorful fabrics produced in a hellish Indian factory in which men and children work 12-hour days for a pittance, some barefoot, some in flip-flops. Rahul Jain captures working conditions that suggest the worst extremes of Dickensian London—his camera unblinking at the torrential cascade of textiles that these clambering, shrieking machines produce, seemingly nonstop. When asked why he made the squalor so beautiful, the filmmaker replied: “so you cannot look away,” and indeed we cannot.

INDIA / GERMANY / FINLAND • 2016 • 72 MINS.  • IN ENGLISH AND HINDI WITH ENGLISH SUBTITLES • KINO LORBER

Presented with generous support from the Richard Brick, Geri Ashur & Sara Bershtel Fund for Social Justice Documentaries.

Reviews

“First-timer Rahul Jain takes his cameras in a textile factory right outside of Calcutta and glides them through hallways, past weary workers and into the bowels of global capitalism in search of answers… A poetic, humanistic look at a sweatshop that leaves its didacticism at the front door.”
– David Fear, RollingStone.com

“An all-too-rare combination of artistic vision and social conscience. Eye-opening and austerely  uncompromising… showing controlled concentration and unfussy flair. Powerfully evokes the sights and sounds - and almost the smells - of a sprawling, stygian textiles plant. A quietly damning expose of dehumanization. A claustrophobic, haunting vision of the kind of grim workplace traditionally associated with the UK of the Victorian era. An overwhelming sensory immersion into a hidden, secretive environment… (of) vast, subterranean expanses.”
– Neil Young, The Hollywood Reporter

“Bristling with angry human-rights subtext. Gliding, quietly mesmerising… The film opens as a hushed, graceful story of machinery in motion, gazing lingerly…to almost hypnotic effect… The camera, elegantly manned by rodrigo Trejo Villanueva… works as macro and micro levels, closing in  on a wealth of expressive and reactive human detail… (A) simultaneously beautiful and abjectly unhappy film.”
– Guy Lodge, Variey

“The nightmare quality of something from a Fritz Lang silent epic.”
– Allan Hunter, Screen Daily