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Slideshow

PREVIOUSLY PLAYED

DOUBLE INDEMNITY & THE POSTMAN ALWAYS RINGS TWICE

Sunday & Monday, December 14 & 15

DOUBLE INDEMNITY
SUN, DEC 14 1:105:3510:00
MON, DEC 15 12:405:15

THE POSTMAN ALWAYS RINGS TWICE
SUN, DEC 143:207:45
MON, DEC 152:5010:00*
*Monday’s 10:00 show is a single feature only

2 films for 1 admission - tickets available at box office only

DOUBLE INDEMNITY

NEW RESTORATION

Starring FRED MACMURRAY, BARBARA STANWYCK, and EDWARD G. ROBINSON

(1944, Billy Wilder) “I killed Dietrichson,” dictates Fred MacMurray’s insurance man Walter Neff, and then the flashbacks begin: prospective client Barbara Stanwyck’s Phyllis Dietrichson, clad only in bath towel and ankle bracelet, exchanges double entendres, then swiftly turns the discussion from auto to accident insurance. But, after her husband’s “accident,” insurance investigator Edward G. Robinson just won’t let it rest. Wilder and Chandler adapted Cain’s then-notorious novel. Approx. 106 min. DCP.
SUN, DEC 14 1:10, 5:35, 10:00
MON, DEC 15 12:40, 5:15

“THE SPIFFY, SUAVE MEGA-NOIR THAT SPAWNED A BILLION SCHEMING-BITCH THRILLERS… Stanwyck and MacMurray become unforgettable, delicious clichés the minute they cock their eyebrows at one another in and around Billy Wilder's shadowy L.A. interiors.” 
– Michael Atkinson, Village Voice 

“THE GOLD STANDARD OF ’40s NOIR!” 
– Jessica Winter, Time Out (London)

THE POSTMAN ALWAYS RINGS TWICE

Starring JOHN GARFIELD and LANA TURNER

(1946, Tay Garnett) “Give me a kiss or I’ll sock ya,” Screen-combusting lovers John Garfield and Lana Turner – dressed more for Park Ave. than the greasy spoon she slings hash in – plot to do away with her nice old husband. Heavily censored from Cain’s novel, but as director Garnett crowed, “We still managed to get the sex across.” Approx. 113 min. 35mm.
SUN, DEC 14 3:20, 7:45
MON, DEC 15 2:50, 10:00*
*Monday’s 10:00 show is a single feature only

 

“GIVES TURNER AND GARFIELD THE BEST ROLES OF THEIR CAREERS!"
– Bosley Crowther, The New York Times

“More grey than noir, [the plot’s] strength is that it is cast as a bleak memory in which, from the far side of paradise, a condemned man surveys the age-old trail through sex, love and disillusionment.”  
– Tom Milne, Time Out (London)