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  • A man leans down to speak to a woman seated on sofa; both are dressed in fine evening wear.
  • A woman laying in bed and a man seated on a chair by her look at each other; both are dressed in white.
  • Close-up on a man and woman's faces; he looks at her and touches her face, but she does not look at him.
PREVIOUSLY PLAYED

Luchino Visconti’s
L’INNOCENTE

Now Streaming

MUST END THURSDAY, JUNE 18

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Director Luchino Visconti
Cast Giancarlo Giannini, Laura Antonelli, Jennifer O’Neill
Screenplay Suso Cecchi D’Amico, Enrico Medioli, Luchino Visconti
Based on the novel by Gabriele D’Annunzio | Cinematography Pasquilino De Santis
1976 | Italy, France | DCP restoration | Approx. 129 min. | In Italian with English subtitles

Philandering turn of the century Nietzschean Superman wannabe Giancarlo Giannini (70s comic star of Lina Wertmüller hits) ironically falls back in love with neglected wife Laura Antonelli when she becomes pregnant by another man — but then becomes insanely jealous of the child. Adapting Gabriele d’Annunzio’s steamy 1892 bestseller, Visconti directed his final film from a wheelchair, following two strokes and a broken leg, but remained as painstaking as ever, spending hours getting Antonelli’s veil just so, and getting a bitingly effective performance from Summer of 42’s Jennifer O’Neill as the cast-off mistress. Screenplay by Visconti, Enrico Medioli and the legendary Suso Cecchi d’Amico.

A FILM MOVEMENT RELEASE

Reviews

“ONE OF VISCONTI’S MOST BEAUTIFUL FILMS… THERE’S NOT A SUPERFLUOUS FRAME IN IT.”
– Vincent Canby, The New York Times

“Returns to the territory Visconti knew best, and forms a worthy finale to a distinguished career... an almost painfully sincere meditation on masculine self-delusion.”
– Tony Rayns, Time Out (London)

“Through Giannini’s joyless intensity, Visconti seems to be savoring the things of this world for the last time. No Visconti film to date has conveyed so intense a feeling of loss.”
– Andrew Sarris

“Masterly in its expressive turn-of-the-century décor, and in its control.”
– Pauline Kael