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Slideshow

  • THE WRONG MAN
  • ROPE
PREVIOUSLY PLAYED

THE WRONG MAN & ROPE

Friday, October 27

THE WRONG MAN
12:30   4:15   8:00
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ROPE
2:35   6:20   10:10
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DOUBLE FEATURE: Two films for one admission. Tickets purchased entitle patrons to stay and see the following film at no additional charge.

THE WRONG MAN

Directed by Alfred Hitchcock
Starring Henry Fonda and Vera Miles

8:00 screening introduced by Scott Eyman, author of Hank and Jim: the Fifty-Year Friendship of Henry Fonda and James Stewart, with book signing following the screening.

(1956) Returning at dawn to Jackson Heights, Stork Club bass player Henry Fonda finds himself trapped in a classic mistaken-identity case. Shot in a ruthlessly restrained semi-doc style on the locations of the actual case, with harrowing sequences of Fonda’s booking and arraignment, and memorable innocent-to-guilty dissolve. 35mm. Approx. 105 min.  
12:30, 4:15, 8:00

“Has an almost Kafkaesque nightmare realism to it.”
– Pauline Kael

“Hitchcock turns the tale of an innocent man mistaken to be a ruthless killer into a harrowing Kafkaesque critique of the American justice system.”
– Eric Monder, Film Journal

ROPE

Directed by Alfred Hitchcock
Starring James Stewart and Farley Granger

6:20 screening introduced by Scott Eyman, author of Hank and Jim: the Fifty-Year Friendship of Henry Fonda and James Stewart, with book signing following the screening.

(1948) Hitchcock’s boldest technical experiment ever, told in a claustrophobic single set, as a murder by effete, thrill-seeking rich boys Farley Granger and John Dall (based on the real-life Leopold and Loeb) is exposed by Professor James Stewart. Shot in continuously moving ten-minute takes, the entire film seems to be composed of only four shots (count ‘em), causing as much suspense on the set as for the audience. 35mm. Approx. 80 min.
2:35, 6:20, 10:10

"Rope is not merely a stunt that is justified by the extraordinary career that contains it, but one of the movies that makes that career extraordinary.”
– Vincent Canby, The New York Times