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  • Actor Edward G. Robinson leans on the desk where Burt Lancaster is seated, and holds onto his wrist.
    ALL MY SONS
  • Actors Edward G. Robinson and Burt Lancaster look at something on a clipboard, on the floor of a factory.
    ALL MY SONS
  • Two men and two women talk in the front yard of a house.
    ALL MY SONS
  • Actor Burt Lancaster, in the foreground, grips a payphone and looks worried; an officer in the background. presents his badge.
    SORRY, WRONG NUMBER
  • Actor Barbara Stanwyck speaks into a phone, looking extremely upset.
    SORRY, WRONG NUMBER
  • Actor Burt Lancaster has his hand on Barbara Stanwyck's neck; their faces are close together but they don't look at each other.
    SORRY, WRONG NUMBER
PREVIOUSLY PLAYED

ALL MY SONS & SORRY, WRONG NUMBER

Monday, July 29

DOUBLE FEATURE: Two films for one admission. Tickets purchased entitle patrons to stay and see the following film at no additional charge.

ALL MY SONS

12:30   4:15   8:00  

(1948, Irving Reis) Airplane parts mogul Edward G. Robinson gets off scot free after 21 planes using his defective parts went down – with his eldest son as one of the pilots. But then remaining son Burt Lancaster returns from combat… Adapted from Arthur Miller’s first big hit. 35mm. Approx. 94 min.

“Mr. Robinson does a superior job of showing the shades of personality in a little tough guy who has a softer side. Arrogant, ruthless and dynamic in those moments when his ‘business’ is at stake, he is also tender and considerate in the presence of those he loves… Burt Lancaster is surprisingly good and, although he appears a bit dim-witted at times, that is not implausible.”
– Bosley Crowther, The New York Times

SORRY, WRONG NUMBER

2:25   6:10   9:55  

(1948, Anatole Litvak) Busy signal on 911? Compare to Barbara Stanwyck’s plight as, bedridden in her Sutton Place river view apartment, she frantically dials for help after overhearing hubby Burt Lancaster’s murder plans. 35mm. Approx. 89 min.

“Stanwyck in one of her most famous roles. Her metamorphosis from indolence to hysteria is brilliantly executed.”
– Tom Charity, Time Out (London)