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  • THE MALTESE FALCON
    THE MALTESE FALCON
  • THE THIN MAN
    THE THIN MAN
PREVIOUSLY PLAYED

THE MALTESE FALCON & THE THIN MAN

Thursday, September 8

THE MALTESE FALCON
2:25   6:20   10:15

THE THIN MAN
12:30   4:25   8:20

DOUBLE FEATURE: Two films for one admission. Tickets purchased entitle patrons to stay and see the following film at no additional charge.

THE MALTESE FALCON

Directed by John Huston
Starring Humphrey Bogart and Mary Astor

(1941) Humphrey Bogart’s Sam Spade traipses through Hammett’s San Fran to recover the world’s most coveted chachka – despite the malevolent connivings of Peter Lorre’s perfumed-card-carrying Joel Cairo, “Fat Man” Sidney Greenstreet’s Kasper Gutman, and Mary Astor’s two-faced “Miss Wonderly.” 35mm. Approx. 100 mins.
2:25, 6:20, 10:15

“PUT DOWN THE FOUNDATIONS for that native American genre of mean streets, knife-edged heroes, dark shadows and tough dames.”
– Roger Ebert, Chicago Sun-Times

“STRIKING VISUAL STYLE!”
– Dave Kehr, Chicago Reader

“[On Bogart] MAGNETISM YOU CAN FEEL THROUGH THE SCREEN.”
– Otis Ferguson, New Republic

THE THIN MAN

(1934, W.S. Van Dyke) William Powell’s Nick Charles and Myrna Loy’s perfect wife Nora take a break from cocktail quaffing to solve a baffling murder, in the picture that wed the whodunit to screwball comedy. Based on the Hammett novel. “Turned several decades of movies upside down by showing a suave man of the world who made love to his own rich, funny, and good-humored wife.” 35mm. Approx. 93 mins.
12:30, 4:25, 8:20

“POWELL IS TO DIALOGUE AS ASTAIRE IS TO DANCE. The drinks are the lubricant for dialogue of elegant wit and wicked timing, used by a character who is decadent on the surface but fundamentally brave and brilliant.”
– Roger Ebert, Chicago Sun-Times

“POWELL IS THOROUGHLY IN HIS ELEMENT! Excellent combination of comedy and excitement.”
– Mordaunt Hall, The New York Times

“A MARVELOUS BLEND OF MARITAL FAMILIARITY AND CONSTANT COURTSHIP, PIXILATED FANTASY AND CHILDLIKE WONDER. None of the five sequels that followed (1936-47) recaptured quite the same flavour.”
– Tom Milne, Time Out (London)