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PREVIOUSLY PLAYED

THE SILENCE OF OTHERS

HELD OVER! Must End Thursday, June 6

4:20 ONLY

PRODUCED AND DIRECTED BY ALMUDENA CARRACEDO AND ROBERT BAHAR
EXECUTIVE PRODUCED BY PEDRO ALMODÓVAR

What if in the ‘60s you were sadistically tortured for your political beliefs – and the man responsible (Antonio González Pacheco, aka “Billy the Kid”) was now your neighbor? The bloody Spanish Civil War (1936-39) was followed by the Franco dictatorship that ended only with his death in 1975 – after which a law granted amnesty for crimes committed throughout this period. THE SILENCE OF OTHERS tackles the legal/political questions that this enforced obliviousness has created, and equally compelling, the existential conundrum of living in a nation in which no one has been charged with the murder of hundreds of thousands, buried in more than 2000 mass graves. A new movement in Spain confronts these hard truths. With the rise of authoritarian regimes around the world – and with human rights abuses being committed on our own border – this film could not be more timely.
 
Presented with support from the Richard Brick, Geri Ashur, and Sara Bershtel Fund for Social Justice Documentaries

SPAIN / USA   2018   96 MINS   IN SPANISH WITH ENGLISH SUBTITLES 
ARGOT PICTURES

Reviews

“An elegant reckoning. Clear-sighted and approachable… with all the force of a classic political thriller by Costa-Gavras or Francesco Rosi.”
– Allan Hunter, Screen International

“Stirring. Well-crafted and informative. A very necessary story, delivered with rigor and conviction.”
– Stephen Dalton, The Hollywood Reporter

“Momentous. Must be seen on the big screen. Hauntingly beautiful. Stylistically situated somewhere between NOSTALGIA FOR THE LIGHT and THE ACT OF KILLING.”
– Musanna Ahmed, Film Inquiry

“Intelligently transports us from sadness to hope, with stirring testimonies, historical documents and intimate, raw scenes of real life. A raw melancholy accompanies the film from start to finish. The lead characters are a courageous and persistent group of civilians. Someone once told me that in Spain, nothing is true until it bleeds. (The film) cruises with a deliberately slow and serious rhythm, like a Holy Week procession… seeking to open cracks in the monolith of post-Francoism obliviousness. The compelling story retains an emotional pulse throughout.”
– Robert Jove, Modern Times Review