Skip to Content

Slideshow

PREVIOUSLY PLAYED

WINTER SOLDIER

2:00   5:20   8:40*

Wednesday, January 24

Directed by the Winterfilm Collective

(1972) One month after the revelations of My Lai, veterans gather at a Detroit Howard Johnson motel to testify on war atrocities. Made by a collective of young filmmakers, many of whom would go onto long, distinguished careers, including Oscar-Award winning director Barbara Kopple (Harlan County, U.S.A., American Dream), editor Nancy Baker (Born Into Brothels, Vanya on 42nd Street), cinematographer Bob Fiore (Pumping Iron) and Emmy Award-winning director/producer David Grubin.  Digital. Approx. 96 min.

Read The Guardian’s John Patterson on Winter Soldier’s production and initial reception here.

Reviews

“An important historical document, an eerily prescient antiwar plea and a dazzling example of filmmaking at its most iconographically potent. But at its best, it is the eloquent, unforgettable tale of profound moral reckoning.” 
– Ann Hornaday, Washington Post

“I always thought this was the most important film we had about this country's tragic involvement in Vietnam, and I still do. It's almost as potent today as it was when it was released, and I suspect it's rarely screened because what it reveals about wartime atrocities and government policies is very hard to face.”
– Jonathan Rosenbaum